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Drugs and Health Products

PORIA - Wolfiporia extensa

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This monograph is intended to serve as a guide to industry for the preparation of Product Licence Applications (PLAs) and labels for natural health product market authorization. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the medicinal ingredient.

Notes

  • Text in parentheses is additional optional information which can be included on the PLA and product label at the applicant's discretion.
  • The solidus (/) indicates that the terms and/or the statements are synonymous. Either term or statement may be selected by the applicant.

Date

December 8, 2015

Proper name(s)

Wolfiporia extensa (Peck) Ginns 1984 (Polyporaceae) (CABI 2014; McGuffin et al. 2000)
Synonym
Poria cocos F.A. Wolf (CABI 2014; PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; McGuffin et al. 2000)

Common name(s)

  • Poria (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; McGuffin et al. 2000)
  • Hoelen (Hobbs 2003; McGuffin et al. 2000)
  • Indian bread (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; McGuffin et al. 2000)
  • Fu ling (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; McGuffin et al. 2000)
  • Sclerotium of tuckahoe/Tuckahoe (Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; McGuffin et al. 2000)

Source material(s)

  • Sclerotium/mycelium (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004)
  • Cultured mycelium (Wasser 2002)

Route(s) of administration

Oral

Dosage form(s)

  • The acceptable pharmaceutical dosage forms include, but are not limited to, capsules, chewables (e.g. gummies, tablets), liquids, powders, strips or tablets.
  • This monograph is not intended to include foods or food-like dosage forms such as bars, chewing gums or beverages.

Use(s) or Purpose(s)

Statement(s) to the effect of
  • Used in Herbal Medicine to support the immune system (Rios 2011; Hobbs 2003; Hoffmann 2003).
  • Source of fungal polysaccharides with immunomodulating properties (Hobbs 2003; Wasser 2002).
  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for small quantity of urination, dizziness and palpitation caused by phlegm-fluid retention, spleen deficiency, reduced food intake, sloppy stool, diarrhea, disquietude of heart spirit, and insomnia (PPRC 2010).
  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to promote urination and leach out dampness (for urinary difficulty and cases of scanty urine due to damp-heat) (Bensky et al. 2004).
  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to promote urination to drain dampness, fortify the spleen, and calm the heart (PPRC 2010).
  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to strengthen the spleen and harmonize the middle burner: for spleen deficiency compounded by dampness with symptoms such as loss of appetite, diarrhea, and epigastric distention (Bensky et al. 2004).
  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to strengthen the spleen and transform phlegm: for spleen deficiency with thin mucous in which phlegm moves upward with symptoms such as palpitations, headache, dizziness, and thick, greasy tongue coating (Bensky et al. 2004).

Dose(s)

Statement(s) to the effect of

Subpopulation(s)

Adults (≥ 18 years)

Quantity(ies)

Potency (Optional): Up to 40% polysaccharides

Source of polysaccharides

Dry, powder, tincture, fluid extract

Up to 3.6 g dried poria, per day (Hobbs 2003).
Decoction
Up to 18 g dried poria, per day (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; Hobbs 2003).

Immune Support based on Herbal Medicine

Dry, powder, tincture, fluid extract
1.6 — 3.6 g dried poria, per day (Hobbs 2003).
Decoction
9 — 18 g dried poria powder, per day (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; Hobbs 2003)

TCM claims

Decoction
9 — 18 g dried poria powder, per day (PPRC 2010; Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004; Hobbs 2003)

Directions for use

Take before meal (Bensky et al. 2004).

Duration(s) of use

Statement(s) to the effect of

For prolonged use, consult a health care practitioner.

Risk information

Statement(s) to the effect of

Caution(s) and warning(s)

TCM

If you have a yin deficiency, sunken spleen qi, or cold from deficiency with spermatorrhea, consult a health care practitioner prior to use (Bensky et al. 2004; Chen and Chen 2004).

Contraindication(s)

No statement required.

Known adverse reaction(s)

All products
  • Hypersensitivity/allergy can occur; in which case, discontinue use (Bensky et al. 2004).
  • Diuretic effect may occur (PPRC 2010).

Non-medicinal ingredients

Must be chosen from the current Natural Health Products Ingredients Database (NHPID) and must meet the limitations outlined in the database.

Storage condition(s)

Statement(s) to the effect of

Store in a tightly closed, light-resistant container in a cool, dry place (PPRC 2010).

Specifications

  • The finished product specifications must be established in accordance with the requirements described in the Natural and Non-Prescription Health Products Directorate Quality of Natural Health Products Guide.
  • The medicinal ingredient must comply with the requirements outlined in the NHPID.

References cited

  • Albers R, Antoine JM, Bourdet-Sicard R, Calder PC, Gleeson M, Lesourd B, Samartín S, Sanderson IR, Van Loo J, Vas Dias FW, Watzl B. Markers to measure immunomodulation in human nutrition intervention studies. British Journal of Nutrition 2005;94(3):452-481.
  • Bensky D, Clavey S, Toger E, Gamble A, editors. Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica. 3rd edition. Seattle (WA): Eastland Press Inc; 2004.
  • CABI 2014: Next link will take you to another Web site Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International. Index Fungorum. Wallingford (GB): CABI (Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International); 2014. [Accessed 2014 December 31].
  • Chen JK, Chen TT. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. Crampton L, editor. City of Industry (CA): Art of Medicine Press Inc; 2004.
  • Hobbs C. Medicinal Mushrooms: An Exploration of Tradition, Healing & Culture. Summertown (TN): Book Publishing Company; 2003.
  • McGuffin M, Kartesz JT, Leung AY, Tucker AO, editors. Herbs of Commerce. 2nd edition. Silver Spring (MD): American Herbal Products Association; 2000.
  • PPRC 2010: Pharmacopoeia of the People‚Äôs Republic of China 2010. Volume I. Beijing (PRC): Chinese Pharmacopoeia Commission; 2010.
  • Rios JL. Chemical constituents and pharmacological properties of Poria cocos. Planta Medica 2011;77(7):681-691.
  • Wasser SP. Medicinal mushrooms as a source of antitumor and immunomodulating polysaccharides. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 2002; 60(3):258-274.

References reviewed